Saturday, October 27, 2012

Taste Starlight—Mixed Media Gelatin Monoprint

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A close up of another gelatin monoprint worked up and into with ink (violet roller-ball and my own gold mix), and coloured pencil.
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This is the artist as actor, not director. The process is one of discovery, where the chattering 'me', that logical voice in my head that mostly sits around asking what's for supper, takes a back seat and I allow the mysterious subconscious to take over and call the shots. While I stubbornly forge my own path through the world of art, that fact is not lost on my that I follow in the tradition of the Automatistes, who looked to stream of consciousness drawing and writing for their creativity. Strange things happen, this one is called Taste Starlight and it's up to you decide what, if anything, it's all about. Me, I just let it happen, and whatever wondering I do will be kept private.

The process itself is exciting, and the making of art becomes an act worth doing.
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This may be par for the course for other artists, but I think I’ve spent too much time in the past trying to make something that would impress someone (could be me) or prove something (look, my trees look like trees!) or be counted as fine art (that’s SOOOOOOO profound).  There is a HUGE amount of freedom in letting go of all that and just DIVING RIGHT IN to a piece and letting things happen.
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Also, I’m having fun with ‘tools of the trade’ photos lately, and now refuse to be ashamed of the scale (or my guitar-pared fingernails!) so here you can see the size of things.
As usual, if I like it enough to blog about it, it’s made available at Etsy.

6 comments:

Jennifer Rose Phillip said...

why would you be ashamed of the scale?

kaslkaos said...

Not anymore, but when I went to college, small was not acceptable. Anything under 18x24 was verboten. Really. Galleries usually only show some pretty large art although there may be economies of scale going on there. Is it different on your side of the pond?

Michelle Basic Hendry said...

When you put something out there, it is amazing what comes back. Things that might appear random help to show us when we are being authentic or not. I always thought you were on your own path. That said there is something more in your recent work. It is speaking!

You keep me thinking and questioning and inspired!

Jennifer Rose Phillip said...

most of the art i have seen in galleries here is pretty big. the small museum here usually has exhibits full of huge pieces that are too big for any of the houses here. in some of the stores that sell art, its a mixture of medium sized work and bigger work but it would still fit in the house :p i have never understood the huge pieces of work when most people live in small houses

Laurel said...

I love the direction your art is taking. There's a lot going on and imagery does have a kind of dream like symbolism.
I chuckled when you were talking about size. I make most of my pieces small because I want to be able to ship them for a reasonable price and that's not the most artistic motivation I suppose. For my gallery show I used big mats. Haha. Made the prints look much bigger!

kaslkaos said...

Thanks Michelle. I'm trying, at the moment, to follow what compels me, even it risks cliche (moon & stars!) because if I avoid such things, it turns into self-censorship. So, well, there it is. Honest art reminds me of hanging out underwear to dry for all to see...
Jennifer, I think the BIG thing is all about conspicuous consumption, LOOK What I can afford. Or its for people who live in really big house, which brings us back to conspicuous consumption (erm...the curmudgeon is back).
Thanks Laurel...Canadian shipping costs does have a way of hemming in the size (11x14)

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